Iain McGilchrist

The Divided Brain Clinic:
The Master & His Emissary

Two-day workshops in:
Melbourne, Sydney & Brisbane

Workshop Pricing

MELBOURNE

MCEC, South Wharf

23 & 24 March 2020

  • SUPER SAVER: $560 until 12 July 2019
  • EARLY: $660 until 17 November 2019
  • STANDARD: $770 until 28 Feb 2020
  • FULL PRICE: $880 from 1 March 2020
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

SYDNEY

SMC Conference & Function Centre

26 & 27 March 2020

  • SUPER SAVER: $560 until 12 July 2019
  • EARLY: $660 until 17 November 2019
  • STANDARD: $770 until 28 Feb 2020
  • FULL PRICE: $880 from 1 March 2020
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

BRISBANE

BCEC, South Bank

30 & 31 March 2020

  • SUPER SAVER: $560 until 12 July 2019
  • EARLY: $660 until 17 November 2019
  • STANDARD: $770 until 28 Feb 2020
  • FULL PRICE: $880 from 1 March 2020
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

I hope you will come away from this workshop feeling that you have never attended one like it before, and that you have learnt to think about both your clients and yourselves in a new way.

The focus of our time together will be what we can learn from hemisphere differences, my principal subject of study for the last 30 years. You can forget most of what you think you know about the topic. The truth is far more fascinating, and lies at the heart of what it means to be a human being. We are used to thinking of the brain as a machine. But in important ways it is nothing like a machine. And when something changes in a patient’s brain, it is not like a component in a machine breaking down: the whole system reconfigures, and with it so does the subject’s reality.

Iain McGilchrist

The Divided Brain: The Master and His Emissary

Iain McGilchrist

…is a former Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, an associate Fellow of Green Templeton College, Oxford, a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Consultant Emeritus of the Bethlem and Maudsley Hospital, London, a former research Fellow in Neuroimaging at Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Baltimore, and a former Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Stellenbosch, who now lives on the Isle of Skye, off the coast of North West Scotland, where he continues to write, and lectures worldwide.

He is committed to the idea that the mind and brain can be understood only by seeing them in the broadest possible context, that of the whole of our physical and spiritual existence, and of the wider human culture in which they arise – the culture which helps to mould, and in turn is moulded by, our minds and brains.

Workshop Information

TRAINING OVERVIEW

I hope you will come away from this course feeling that you have never attended one like it before, and that you have learnt to think about both your patients and yourselves in a new way. The focus of our sessions will be what we can learn from hemisphere differences, my principal subject of study for the last 30 years. You can forget most of what you think you know about the topic. The truth is far more fascinating, and lies at the heart of what it means to be a human being. We are used to thinking of the brain as a machine. But in important ways it is nothing like a machine. And when something changes in a patient’s brain, it is not like a component in a machine breaking down: the whole system reconfigures, and with it so does the subject’s reality.

In this course, you will learn about the differences between hemispheres in how they pay attention to the world, which governs what we see and how we understand it.

How those differences manifest in mental illnesses, including depression, psychosis, autism, eating disorders, ADHD, and a range of fascinating neuropsychiatric conditions. You will learn about the differences between the hemispheres in relationship to the body and embodied knowledge; the importance of the implicit, and how it is overlooked in favour of the explicit; the need to balance generalisation with appreciation of uniqueness, familiarity with newness, fixity with flow, separation with union.

You will learn about hemisphere differences in emotional and cognitive intelligence, social awareness and reaching reliable judgment: their roles in truth-telling, morality and denial.

We will examine the role of language: why do we have it? How does it change our relationship with the world? What is the place of metaphor and narrative? How do they contribute to therapy? We will discuss different kinds of knowledge, and their relationship with the hemispheres; the strengths and weaknesses of analogical thinking versus analytic thinking.

We will think about which paths we should adopt arriving at the truth: the parts played by science, reason, intuition, and imagination, and how the hemispheres contribute to each of these. And we will find, I hope, common ground for approaching ultimate questions about the relationship between consciousness and the brain, the importance and origins of meaning and purpose, and the proper place of the sacred in our lives.

DAY ONE PROGRAM

Please Note: Dr McGilchrist may well diverge from the times and program below.

Time Day One Topics
08:00am – 09:00am Day One sign-in
09:00am – 10:30am

Hemisphere Overview

The evolutionary background to hemisphere difference. The way in which attention determines what we find in the world. How we combine versions of the world in the brain. What is wrong with the conventional model of hemisphere difference. How to reconceive differences. An exploration in depth of the 12 most important overarching ways in which the hemispheres see the world differently and the difference this makes to how we think, feel and behave. The importance of context and the implicit. The difference between mapping and experiencing. The potential conflict between the capacity to use and the capacity to understand. The changing role of the corpus callosum with evolution. The creative nature of inhibition. Hemisphere cooperation and competition rivalry. What we can learn from split-brain subjects. How we see the world today.

10:30am – 11:00am Morning Break
11:00am – 12:30pm

Hemisphere Overview (ctd)

12:30pm – 1:30pm Lunch
1:30pm – 3:00pm

The Nature of Language and Music

What is language? How did it evolve? Interspecies aspects; intercultural aspects. Why do we have language at all? For communication? For thinking? Where are the different parts of language processed in the brain? What are the strengths of language? What does it hide from us? What does this tell us about therapy? The importance of metaphor. What is music? Some interspecies aspects. Music and the brain. Similarities and differences with language. Hemisphere contributions to different aspects of language and music. Using music rather than language as way of thinking about relationships.

3:00pm – 3:30pm Afternoon Break
3:30pm—4:30pm

The Social and Emotional Brain

The need to balance individuality and communality. Different kinds of each. The relationship between emotion, moral reasoning and moral behaviour. Theory of mind and the hemispheres. Introduction to the social brain, autism, schizophrenia and lateralisation. Contrast with depression. Hemisphere contributions to understanding emotion, mental state reasoning, making moral judgements, reading body language. Generation of false beliefs and delusions. Understanding social intentions and contextual meaning. Emotional expressivity, emotional receptivity, emotional self-control and hemisphere differences. Face recognition, directional gaze, interpretation of facial expression: their importance in the mother-infant dyad. Narrative and human meaning. Continuity of personal identity and mutual interdependence.

4:30pm Day One Close
DAY TWO PROGRAM

Please Note: Dr McGilchrist may well diverge from the times and program below.

Time Day Two Topics
08:00am – 09:00am Day Two sign-in
9:00am – 10:30am

Hemisphere Deficit Syndromes

Further analysis of aspects of psychosis and depression; as well as autism spectrum disorders. ADHD, dyslexia, eating disorders, and personality disorders with respect to hemisphere imbalance. Aspects of aphasia and apraxia; disorders of time, space, and emotion; neglect syndromes and denial; syndromes of bodily and personal disintegration, reduplication, misidentification, and loss of face recognition; types of hallucinations, illusions, delusions, Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome; paranoid syndromes, erotomania, delusional jealousy, Capgras and Fregoli syndromes, ‘walking dead’ syndrome. Loss of insight in illness and personality.

10:30 – 11:00am Morning Break
11:00am – 12:30pm

Reason and Intuition

The difference between reason and rationality. The proper balance of mythos and logos. The virtues and vices of abstraction. The use and abuse of precision and calculation. Ambiguity. Linearity and non-linearity. Inclusive versus exclusive ways of thinking. The importance of symbols and mythical narratives. The brain correlates of intuition: the nature of instincts and the role of epigenesis; the difference between prejudice and bias; cognitive biases and heuristics; gut feelings; embodied skills in pilots, nurses, art connoisseurs, therapists, doctors and chess grandmasters. Problem solving and moments of insight.

12:30pm – 1:30pm Lunch
1:30pm – 3:00pm

Creativity and Imagination

Life as intrinsically creative: the nature of imagination and its distinctness from fantasy. The role played by imagination and creativity in science and mathematics, as well as in poetry, art and music. The different contributions of the hemispheres.

3:00pm – 3:30pm Afternoon Break
3:30pm—4:30pm

In Depth Q & A Session

Your questions – and what they reveal about how we conceive and misconceive the world nowadays. How to go forwards, not just in helping our clients, but in coming to an understanding of our own lives, the cosmos and the place of human consciousness in it.

4:30pm Day Two Close
About Iain McGilchrist

Iain McGilchrist is a former Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, an associate Fellow of Green Templeton College, Oxford, a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Consultant Emeritus of the Bethlem and Maudsley Hospital, London, a former research Fellow in Neuroimaging at Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Baltimore, and a former Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Stellenbosch, who now lives on the Isle of Skye, off the coast of North West Scotland, where he continues to write, and lectures worldwide.

He is committed to the idea that the mind and brain can be understood only by seeing them in the broadest possible context, that of the whole of our physical and spiritual existence, and of the wider human culture in which they arise – the culture which helps to mould, and in turn is moulded by, our minds and brains.

He was a late entrant to medicine. After a scholarship to Winchester College, he was awarded a scholarship to New College, Oxford, where he read English. He won the Chancellor’s English Essay Prize and the Charles Oldham Shakespeare Prize in 1974 and graduated (with congratulated 1st Class Hons) in 1975 (MA 1979). He was awarded a Prize Fellowship of All Souls College, Oxford in 1975, teaching English literature and pursuing interests in philosophy and psychology between 1975 and 1982. He then went on to train in medicine, and during this period All Souls re-elected him to a further Fellowship (1984-1991), and again in 2002 (to 2004).

He was formerly a Consultant Psychiatrist of the Bethlem Royal and Maudsley NHS Trust in London, where he was Clinical Director of their southern sector Acute Mental Health Services. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and a former Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Stellenbosch. He trained at the Maudsley Hospital in London, working on specialist units including the Neuropsychiatry and Epilepsy Unit, the Children’s Unit and the Forensic Unit, as well as, at Senior Registrar level, the National Psychosis Referral Unit and the National Eating Disorder Unit. During this period he also worked as a Research Fellow in neuroimaging at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, USA. His clinical experience has been broad-based, and he has run a busy Community Mental Health Team in an ethnically diverse and socially deprived area of south London.

He has published original research on neuroimaging in schizophrenia, the phenomenology of schizophrenia, and other topics, and contributed chapters to books on a wide range of subjects, as well as original articles in papers and journals, including the British Journal of Psychiatry, American Journal of Psychiatry, Philosophy, Psychiatry & Psychology, Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, BMJ, Lancet, TLS, London Review of Books, LA Review of Books, Listener, Literary Review, Essays in Criticism, Modern Language Review, English Historical Review, Wall Street Journal, Sunday Times and Sunday Telegraph, on topics in literature, medicine, psychiatry and philosophy. He has taken part in nearly twenty radio and TV programmes and documentaries, including The Moral Maze, Start the Week, and Today, and a Canadian full-length feature film about his work is in production.

His books include Against Criticism (Faber), The Master and his Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World (Yale UP), The Divided Brain and the Search for Meaning; Why Are We So Unhappy? (Yale UP), and Ways of Attending (Routledge, in press).

He is currently working on a number of further books: There Are No Things, a book of epistemology and metaphysics, to be published by Penguin; some reflections on the humanities and sciences commissioned by OUP; a critique of contemporary society and culture from the standpoint of neuropsychology; a study of the paintings of subjects with psychotic illnesses; and a series of essays about culture and the brain with subjects from Andrew Marvell to Serge Gainsbourg.

Do I get a Certificate of Attendance? What about CPD hours/points?

Byron Clinic Pty Ltd provides a Certificate of Attendance to each workshop attendee. Certificates will be completed using the given name at the point of initial online registration and payment. These will be distributed as a hard copy to participants prior to the conclusion of the workshop. It is the attendee’s responsibility to ensure that they have their Certificate of Attendance at the time of distribution.

This workshop should accrue a maximum of 11 hours of learning. Certificates of attendance at this Professional Development activity will be distributed at the workshop. For CPD points for specific organisations, please see: APS, AASW, RANZCP, ANZCMHN.

Please ensure that you have received your certificate prior to the end of the workshop. Requests for duplicate certificates after this period will incur an administration fee.

What are the training terms & conditions?

Please refer to our terms and conditions here.

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No, the only discounts available are our time-based booking windows: ‘keen’, ‘early’, ‘standard’ etc. The earlier you book, the lower the registration fee.

Any Further Questions?

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The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World

by Iain McGilchrist

“A dazzling masterpiece, hugely ambitious and the most comprehensive, profound book ever written on brain laterality, which examines how our two brain hemispheres differ, relate to each other, and the huge implications of this discovery. We have two brain hemispheres, each capable of functioning independently. Each has a different point of view about the world. The right hemisphere – long thought of as “non-dominant” – is actually the Master, perceiving the world more directly, holistically and in context; the left is its Emissary, meant to serve the Master by developing more focused attention, when called for, and creating maps of the world. McGilchrist shows, through a brilliantly rich survey of the Western world, how in different eras, the arts, sciences, philosophy and even psychological health flourish when the balance between left and right is maintained. But our brains are plastic, and today, the plastic left hemisphere has become too dominant, inhibiting the right, and thinks itself the Master (this is not simply an anthropomorphism; the left hemisphere does not see its limitations, and confuses the maps it makes for the world it maps).

Our art, aesthetics, philosophy, technologies, even our legal systems and bureaucracies show these stifling effects, and new kinds of mental illnesses have emerged. One puts down this beautifully written, profound, philosophically sophisticated book thinking psychiatrist and former Oxford English professor McGilchrist might just be one of the most learned people in Europe.”

Professor Norman Doidge

Author of "The Brain That Changes Itself", University of Toronto & Columbia University, NY

Workshop Pricing

MELBOURNE

MCEC, South Wharf

23 & 24 March 2020

  • SUPER SAVER: $560 until 12 July 2019
  • EARLY: $660 until 17 November 2019
  • STANDARD: $770 until 28 Feb 2020
  • FULL PRICE: $880 from 1 March 2020
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

SYDNEY

SMC Conference & Function Centre

26 & 27 March 2020

  • SUPER SAVER: $560 until 12 July 2019
  • EARLY: $660 until 17 November 2019
  • STANDARD: $770 until 28 Feb 2020
  • FULL PRICE: $880 from 1 March 2020
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

BRISBANE

BCEC, South Bank

30 & 31 March 2020

  • SUPER SAVER: $560 until 12 July 2019
  • EARLY: $660 until 17 November 2019
  • STANDARD: $770 until 28 Feb 2020
  • FULL PRICE: $880 from 1 March 2020
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

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