Allan Schore in Australia, 2019

Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney:
May 2019

WORKSHOP ANNOUNCEMENT FROM ALLAN SCHORE

I’ve decided to add to the Australian lectures my very recent work on the role of the right brain in group psychotherapy. I will discuss how right brain communications of conscious and especially unconscious affects occur beneath the words of the group member’s narratives, and how this system of nonverbal communication is implicitly embedded in group processes.

I will suggest that emotion-communicating and affect-regulating relational mechanisms more so than interpretations and cognitive insight are primary mechanisms of change in group psychotherapy. I will also focus on reenactments of early attachment trauma in the group setting.

Allan Schore: The Role of the Right Brain in Group Psychotherapy

by Allan Schore

In the months immediately before my Australian seminar, I have presented plenary addresses to the annual conferences of The American Body Psychotherapy Association in Santa Barbara California, the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation World Congress on Complex Trauma in New York City, and the American Group Psychotherapy Association in Los Angeles. Although the Australian workshop will cover the first two, I have decided to add the group psychotherapy material to the Australian lectures.

Over the last three decades I have published 6 books and numerous articles and chapters on the central role of right brain unconscious mechanisms in emotional communication and affect regulation in early development and in psychotherapy. In addition to offering developmental interpersonal neurobiological models of attachment and relational trauma, my work in psychotherapy continues to characterize the right-lateralized brain/mind/body mechanisms that operate beneath the words in therapeutic change processes.

Towards that end I continue to offer recent research and clinical descriptions of right brain functions in early dysregulating attachment processes, in unconscious nonverbal communications of emotional deficits within the therapeutic alliance, in patient-therapist transference-countertransference transactions, in mutual therapeutic re-enactments of early relational trauma, in rupture and repair transactions, and in affect regulatory empathic repair of the subjective self. These themes will be discussed in the Byron Bay lectures on the application of regulation theory to individual psychotherapy.

The construct of the unconscious is now shifting from an intangible, immaterial, metapsychological abstraction of the mind to a psychoneurobiological heuristic function of a tangible brain that has material form.

I will focus on reenactments of early attachment trauma in the group setting. Towards that end I will also discuss the importance of mutual regression in these reenactments, and describe the interpersonal neurobiological mechanisms by which these transferential unconscious dynamics can be shared, emotionally experienced, and interactively regulated by not only the empathic group leader but by psychobiologically attuned group members.

I have recently discussed working with the nonverbal defenses of dissociation and repression that block traumatic affects from reaching consciousness within individual psychotherapy. In this talk I will apply this model to working with these defenses in the group psychotherapy context. Current neuroscience, especially recent studies of the right brain, the psychobiological substrate of the human unconscious, now allow us to understand more than content but process, and thereby underlying mechanisms of therapeutic changes.

In another upcoming volume The Development of the Unconscious Mind I present a large body of evidence indicating that the development of the right lateralized unconscious mind begins in the prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal stages of human infancy and continues across all later stages of the life span. The construct of the unconscious is now shifting from an intangible, immaterial, metapsychological abstraction of the mind to a psychoneurobiological heuristic function of a tangible brain that has material form. Using the essential construct of group psychotherapy, group cohesion, I will suggest that the interpersonal neurobiological mechanism of a relational unconscious that communicates with another relational unconscious also operates in the group context.

This model suggests that group psychotherapy can change not only the patient’s left hemispheric conscious mind, but her right hemispheric unconscious mind.

Byron Clinic is presenting Allan Schore in his forthcoming series of 2-day Australian workshops in May 2019: “The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy”.
Find out more…

Allan Schore in Australia, 2019

Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney:
May 2019

I’ve decided to add to the Australian lectures my very recent work on the role of the right brain in group psychotherapy.

I’ll draw on my last book The Science and the Art of Psychotherapy and on one of my next two volumes Right Brain Psychotherapy to apply Regulation Theory to the change processes of group psychotherapy. I will discuss how right brain communications of conscious and especially unconscious affects occur beneath the words of the group member’s narratives, and how this system of nonverbal communication is implicitly embedded in group processes. I will suggest that emotion communicating and affect regulating relational mechanisms, more so than interpretations and cognitive insight, are the primary mechanisms of change in group psychotherapy.

Allan Schore

Author, The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy

Allan Schore PhD…

…is on the clinical faculty of the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, and at the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, and Development.

He is author of four seminal volumes, Affect Regulation and the Origin of the Self, Affect Dysregulation and Disorders of the Self, Affect Regulation and the Repair of the Self, and The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy, as well as numerous articles and chapters. His Regulation Theory, grounded in developmental neuroscience and developmental psychoanalysis, focuses on the origin, psychopathogenesis, and psychotherapeutic treatment of the early forming subjective implicit self.

His contributions appear in multiple disciplines, including developmental neuroscience, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, developmental psychology, attachment theory, trauma studies, behavioral biology, clinical psychology, and clinical social work. His groundbreaking integration of neuroscience with attachment theory has led to his description as “the American Bowlby,” with emotional development as “the world’s leading authority on how our right hemisphere regulates emotion and processes our sense of self,” and with psychoanalysis as “the world’s leading expert in neuropsychoanalysis.”

The American Psychoanalytic Association has described Dr. Schore as “a monumental figure in psychoanalytic and neuropsychoanalytic studies.”

Allan Schore in Australia, 2019

Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney:
May 2019

1 Comment

  1. Do you think that early childhood emotional trauma/s could cause right temporal lobe & eventually medication resistant epilepsy?

    Reply

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