Allan Schore PhD

The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy

Two-day workshops in:
Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney: May 2019

Workshop Pricing

BRISBANE

BCEC, South Bank

2 & 3 May 2019

  • SUPER SAVER: $660 until 8 Feb. 2019
  • EARLY: $770 until 22 March 2019
  • STANDARD: $880 from 23 March 2019
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

MELBOURNE

MCEC, South Wharf

8 & 9 May 2019

  • SUPER SAVER: $660 until 8 Feb. 2019
  • EARLY: $770 until 22 March 2019
  • STANDARD: $880 from 23 March 2019
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

SYDNEY

Wesley Conference Centre

13 & 14 May 2019

  • SUPER SAVER: $660 until 8 Feb. 2019
  • EARLY: $770 until 22 March 2019
  • STANDARD: $880 from 23 March 2019
  • all prices in A$ & includes GST & admin fee

REGISTER NOW

The Art of the Science of Psychotherapy

Over the last three decades Allan Schore’s ground-breaking studies in regulation theory continue to offer clinical models of the development, psychopathogenesis, and the repair of the right brain subjective self. His ongoing work on the interpersonal neurobiology of attachment, relational trauma, and re-enactments of early attachment dynamics has focused on a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change.

In these two day workshops he will describe his award-winning research on how early relational trauma imprints an enduring physiological reactivity of the early developing right brain and a susceptibility to later disorders of affect regulation, expressed in a deficit in the capacity to cope with future social-emotional stressors and a predisposition to a spectrum of psychiatric disorders.

Allan Schore PhD

… Dr. Allan Schore is on the clinical faculty of the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, and at the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, and Development. He is author of four seminal volumes, Affect Regulation and the Origin of the Self, Affect Dysregulation and Disorders of the Self, Affect Regulation and the Repair of the Self, and The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy, as well as numerous articles and chapters. His Regulation Theory, grounded in developmental neuroscience and developmental psychoanalysis, focuses on the origin, psychopathogenesis, and psychotherapeutic treatment of the early forming subjective implicit self.

His contributions appear in multiple disciplines, including developmental neuroscience, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, developmental psychology, attachment theory, trauma studies, behavioral biology, clinical psychology, and clinical social work. His groundbreaking integration of neuroscience with attachment theory has led to his description as “the American Bowlby,” with emotional development as “the world’s leading authority on how our right hemisphere regulates emotion and processes our sense of self,” and with psychoanalysis as “the world’s leading expert in neuropsychoanalysis.”

The American Psychoanalytic Association has described Dr. Schore as “a monumental figure in psychoanalytic and neuropsychoanalytic studies.”

Workshop Information

TRAINING OVERVIEW

Over the last three decades Allan Schore’s ground-breaking studies in regulation theory continue to offer clinical models of the development, psychopathogenesis, and the repair of the right brain subjective self. His ongoing work on the interpersonal neurobiology of attachment, relational trauma, and re-enactments of early attachment dynamics has focused on a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change. In these two workshops he will describe his award-winning research on how early relational trauma imprints an enduring physiological reactivity of the early developing right brain and a susceptibility to later disorders of affect regulation, expressed in a deficit in the capacity to cope with future social-emotional stressors and a predisposition to a spectrum of psychiatric disorders.

In these lectures and audience dialogues he will outline the emotional dysregulation and relational deficits that are the outcome of traumatic dysregulating attachment experiences, as well as the impaired right brain development that is addressed in affect regulation psychotherapy. A large body of studies shows that the major processes of therapeutic change in these intrapsychic and interpersonal areas lie in implicit emotional nonverbal communications and interactive affect regulation within the evolving therapeutic relationship, and not in explicit verbal intellectual insight. These therapeutic change mechanisms are expressed in the intersubjective dynamics of the social-emotional right brain, and in right brain-to-right brain communications between the patient and therapist that occur beneath levels of awareness. Regulation theory’s subjective focus can be applied to any clinician’s understanding of how his or her implicit bodily-based self can be more effectively accessed in the treatment of early forming self pathologies.

In the first day, using PowerPoint presentations, he will discuss the clinician’s therapeutic expertise in relational and neurobiological change mechanisms that lie at the core of psychotherapy, especially in histories of early attachment trauma. This expertise is specifically in clinical sensitivity and receptiveness to conscious and unconscious nonverbal affective communications, clinical empathy, clinical intuition, and a clinical capacity for implicit interactive affect regulation.

The afternoon session will offer neurobiological research which highlights the essential role of interpersonal creativity in a growth promoting therapeutic environment. The creative therapist’s personal intersubjective skill in empathically resonating with and regulating the client’s conscious and especially unconscious affective communications beneath the words is central to facilitating structural changes and promoting growth of the right hemisphere. Such neuroplastic changes are vital for adaptive progressions of the patient’s emotion processing, relational, and stress regulating systems.

On the second day of the workshop Dr. Schore draws on his next two new Norton volumes, Right Brain Psychotherapy and The Development of the Unconscious Mind in order to further elucidate his ongoing work on the mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change that operate at implicit levels of the therapeutic alliance, beneath the exchanges of language, explicit cognitions, and voluntary behaviour.

In line with the current two-person relational trend in psychotherapy, he will explain that such interpersonal neurobiological mechanisms occur in heightened affective moments of clinical regressions – defined as the process of returning to an earlier stage of development, which in turn allows for a potential corrective emotional experience in therapeutic reenactments of attachment trauma. Citing both clinical research and case examples, Dr. Schore argues that although the paradoxical process of regression may reflect a clinical deterioration, regulated therapeutic mutual regressions may represent a creative return to fundamentals and origins that can facilitate a potential reorganization, leading to better integration, healthy individuation, and increases in the adaptive capacities of play and intimacy.

DAY ONE PROGRAM
Time Day One Topics
08:00am – 09:00am Day One sign-in
09:00am – 10:30am An interpersonal neurobiological model of clinical expertise for working with early relational trauma
Referring to his last volume, The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy, Dr. Schore will present his work on the right brain mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change that operate at nonconscious levels of the therapeutic alliance. In the first day PowerPoint presentations he will discuss the clinician’s therapeutic expertise in relational and neurobiological change mechanisms that lie at the core of psychotherapy, especially in histories of early attachment trauma and the relational origins of personality disorders.

Using clinical examples he will discuss a model of clinical expertise for receiving, processing, and regulating the patient’s bodily based affective states, including dysregulating states of relational trauma. He will cite neurobiological research which indicates that the therapist’s interpersonal skill in empathically resonating with and regulating the patient’s conscious and especially unconscious affective communications is central to facilitating structural changes in the patient’s right brain emotion processing and stress regulating systems. He will focus on subcortical right brain systems of the deep unconscious, and how they can be directly accessed in treatment.

Dr. Schore will offer interdisciplinary evidence that our conception of the expert clinician has changed, from one who offers insight-oriented interpretations in order make the unconscious conscious to one who optimally processes and regulates the patient’s unconsciously communicated bodily-based affective states in order to facilitate the growth of the right lateralized unconscious mind and thereby a coherent subjective sense of self.

10:30am – 11:00am Morning Break
11:00am – 12:30pm An interpersonal neurobiological model of clinical expertise for working with early relational trauma (ctd)
12:30pm – 1:30pm Lunch
1:30pm – 3:00pm Creativity in psychotherapy: An adaptive function of the right brain unconscious
Within psychology and psychiatry there has been a long history studying creativity in not only people with outstanding achievements and those with mental disorders, but also as a personality trait in all individuals. In parallel, a body of neuroscience research highlights the essential role of the right hemisphere in creativity. Indeed, authors are now contending that the immense capacity of human beings to be creative can be gleaned from virtually all realms of our lives whenever we generate original ideas, develop novel solutions to problems, or express ourselves in a unique and individual manner.

In a PowerPoint lecture and dialogue both the neuroscience and clinical literatures will be cited to offer an interpersonal neurobiological model of interpersonal creativity in the psychotherapeutic context, in both patient and therapist. As examples he will describe the critical role of the clinician’s creativity when working with right brain processes, especially in expertise for working in joint re-enactments of attachment dynamics. This expertise in turn expands the patient’s tolerance for interpersonal novelty and psychotherapeutic change. Neurobiological data will be discussed which suggests that an optimal therapeutic alliance can expand both the patient’s and the therapist’s right brain implicit creative functions.

3:00pm – 3:30pm Afternoon Break
3:30pm—4:30pm Creativity in psychotherapy: An adaptive function of the right brain unconscious (ctd)
4:30pm Day One Close
DAY TWO PROGRAM
Time Day Two Topics
08:00am – 09:00am Day Two sign-in
9:00am – 10:30am Working with re-enactments of attachment trauma and dissociated affect in spontaneous mutual regressions
In this second day workshop, Dr. Schore will draw on his next two volumes, Right Brain Psychotherapy and The Development of the Unconscious Mind in order to offer his most recent work on generating interpersonal neurobiological models of the growth-promoting role of mutual regressions in deep psychotherapy. In line with the current two-person relational trend in psychotherapy, he explains that this interpersonal neurobiological mechanism occurs in heightened affective moments of clinical regressions – defined as the process of returning to an earlier stage of development, a place of origin.

In these mutual regressions both the patient and therapist transiently shift from the late maturing verbal left brain to the early developing nonverbal right brain imprinted by attachment dynamics. These synchronized mutual regressions facilitate the re-enactment of relational trauma in a safe therapeutic context, and the joint exploration of transference-countertransference dynamics rooted in the earlier stages of development. The relational context of rupture and repair of the therapeutic alliance allows for the communication and regulation of self states associated with intense negative affect and a corrective emotional experience.

In patients with a history of attachment trauma and dissociation (e.g., personality disorders) although the paradoxical process of regression may reflect a clinical deterioration it may also represent a creative return to fundamentals and origins that can facilitate a potential reorganization leading to better integration, healthy individuation, and increases in the adaptive capacities of creativity, play, and intimacy. During synchronized mutual regressions the therapist’s interpersonal creativity can act as a growth-promoting therapeutic mechanism that can lead to progressions in complexity of emotional and relational development. Adaptive mutual regressions thus serve as an important regulatory context which can transform insecure into earned secure attachments.

10:30 – 11:00am Morning Break
11:00am – 12:30pm Working with re-enactments of attachment trauma and dissociated affect in spontaneous mutual regressions (ctd)
12:30pm – 1:30pm Lunch
1:30pm – 3:00pm Working with repressed unconscious affect in voluntary mutual regressions
Dr. Schore will discuss his recent studies of defenses against strong affect in psychotherapy, especially focusing on the neurobiological and clinical differences between dissociation and repression that both block painful affects from reaching consciousness. Operating at levels beneath conscious awareness, the passive defense of dissociation and the active defense of repression are major contributors to the patient’s unconscious resistance to psychotherapeutic change, and thus have important intrapsychic impacts on the processes that underlie the psychotherapeutic repair of the self. He will present neuropsychoanalytic models and clinical examples differentiating mutual regressions of dissociated affect from repressed affect, at different stages of therapy.

With respect to repression, the blocking of right brain affect by the left hemisphere, over the course of the treatment the more the patient uses regulated regressions that shift dominance into adaptive regulated right hemispheric relational and subjective functions, the more he or she accesses mutual structural regressions to activate moments of deep intimate contact with emotionally salient close others, the more the characterological “highly repressed” affect blocking defense is reduced. In “deep psychotherapy,” the therapeutic transformation of rigid and pathological repression to adaptive and resilient repression can allow for a re-balancing of the right and left hemispheres. The left hemispheric conscious mind can now tolerate even higher intensities of both negative and positive affects generated by the right hemispheric unconscious mind.

This interpersonal neurobiological re-balancing of the left brain explicit, objective self with the right brain implicit, subjective self promotes enhanced assess to the unique adaptive functions of each of the cerebral hemispheres. Therapeutic synchronized regressions that are mutually repaired and regulated enhance the patient’s creative approaches to conflicts, which represent complementary different perspectives and motivational systems of the right and left hemispheres.

3:00pm – 3:30pm Afternoon Break
3:30pm—4:30pm Working with repressed unconscious affect in voluntary mutual regressions (ctd)
4:30pm Day Two Close
Do I get a Certificate of Attendance? What about CPD hours/points?

Byron Clinic Pty Ltd provides a Certificate of Attendance to each workshop attendee. Certificates will be completed using the given name at the point of initial online registration and payment. These will be distributed as a hard copy to participants prior to the conclusion of the workshop. It is the attendee’s responsibility to ensure that they have their Certificate of Attendance at the time of distribution.

This workshop should accrue a maximum of 11 hours of learning. Certificates of attendance at this Professional Development activity will be distributed at the workshop. For CPD points for specific organisations, please see: APS, AASW, RANZCP, ANZCMHN.

Please ensure that you have received your certificate prior to the end of the workshop. Requests for duplicate certificates after this period will incur an administration fee.

What are the training terms & conditions?

Please refer to our terms and conditions here.

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Any Further Questions?

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Allan Schore has become a heroic figure among many psychotherapists for his massive reviews of neuroscience that center on the patient-therapist relationship.

—Daniel Goleman

Author of Social Intelligence

The Science of the Art of Psychotherapy

by Allan N. Schore Ph.D

From beginning to end of this volume and in a profoundly satisfying and refreshingly accessible fashion, Schore manages to bring together the incisiveness and clarity of his analytical left brain with the creativity and synthetic ability of his intuitive right brain in the interest of capturing the beauty of something that few have dared to try and fewer still have been able to accomplish, namely, to offer a compelling explanation for how exactly a psychotherapy works and what exactly its scientific underpinnings are. With courage, passion, and conviction, Schore rises to the challenge of capturing (by way of words) the essence of the mystical process that operates (without words) beneath the surface of a successful psychotherapy.”

Martha Stark, MD

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Reviewed in "Psychoanalytic Psychology"

“Allan Schore reveals himself as a polymath, the depth and breadth of whose reading–bringing together neurobiology, developmental neurochemistry, behavioral neurology, evolutionary biology, developmental psychoanalysis, and infant psychiatry–is staggering.”

British Journal of Psychiatry

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